The official site of The Project Red Ribbon Care Management Foundation, Inc. (TRR).

  • TRR LOVE FUND

    TRR Love Fund is the arm of the foundation which provides medical assistance to the financially challenged PLHIV.

  • Care assistance for HIV Test

    The Care Assistant Program involves assistance to HIV testing and HIV and AIDS Treatment hubs in the Philippines. Our volunteers schedule the client to the clinic or hub, assist with the procedure in the clinic or hub and conduct peer counseling

  • HOTLINE ASSISTANCE

    With the TRR Hotline Numbers, our volunteers answer concerns and inquiries about HIV and AIDS, do counselling, refers clients to nearest HIV Testing facility, HIV and AIDS Treatment Hub and government and NGO organizations for support

  • PEER COUNSELING

    The foundation volunteers conduct one-on-one counseling either on the phone or in person. They also conduct group counseling

  • SUPPORT GROUP TALK

    The support group talk (SGT) is a program that involves giving HIV lectures by guest speakers, discuss topics about HIV, care, treatment and support, discussion issues related to HIV

  • OUTREACH PROGRAM

    The foundation's outreach program is geared towards providing support to our fellow PLHIV's in the HIV and AIDS Treatment Hubs. Volunteers hand out of donations of medicines and special gifts to PLHIV, give inspirational talks by invited guests to a group of PLHIV, bonding over snacks or meal, visit the sick who are confined in the hospital

  • Referral System

    As part of treatment, the foundation's referral program involves our volunteers referring clients to specialized doctors who are HIV friendly. The foundation has it's own list of specialty doctors of low cost for the indigent PLHIV.

  • Online Support Group

    The foundation has a private Online Support Group in facebook. This group of advocates, supporters, counselors, health Workers and PLHIV

  • Home Health

    Aside from client counselling, the foundation volunteers also do family counselling and home visitation for awareness and continuance of care.

  • Health Fitness

    The foundation believes in holistic approach to treatment and care, thus inclusion of these programs: yoga, dance, swimming, jogging and running, boot camp workouts

  • EVENTS

    As part of awareness and education program, the foundation organizes its own national events to coincide with the international AIDS events: World AIDS Day and International AIDS Candlelight Memorial

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Road to Awareness


The Project Red Ribbon (TRR) will be inaugurating its newest project for this year, the Road to Awareness: an Open Discussion About HIV and Me. This is under the HIV Education and Awareness Talk program of TRR.

This is a Metro Manila wide HIV Awareness Caravan for universities, colleges and schools; companies, organizations and communities. The project includes an HIV talk, Testimonials from guest people living with HIV, condom and lubricant distribution; and HIV flyer distribution.

How can you participate?

1. Coordinate with your school, organization, company, barangay
2. Give us a schedule, venue and number participants for the talk
3. This is FREE. However, we ask as counterpart donations for the Love Fund.

For more details, please contact the TRR Hotline numbers below or email us at contact@projectredribbon.org.

May we all be partners in this great endeavor.

Thank you.








QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122
0916-216-2066

If you want to join a private HIV support group in Facebook, please add me, Pozzie Pinoy and request to be added in the group. We have a lot of PLHIV, counselors, HIV doctors, advocates and supporters who you can talk to.

I hope I was able to answer your concerns. Feel free to email me again if you have other questions.


Stay healthy,
Pozziepinoy

"We act FAST when we CARE"

-Pozziepinoy-



Want to be ASSISTED for the HIV TEST?? 
Check this link:


If you have comments or questions, please click this link:





© Copyright. All Rights Reserved by Pozziepinoy 2012

Credits: 














Confused

Dear Pozzie,

I am not good in writing in English Language, so please pardon me. Yes, as stated on the subject above, for me, it's like that everyday is like living with one foot in the grave.

It was end of May this year when notice that I am having a different symptoms of having an HIV. Mouth Ulcer are so frequent, then the rushes. I quickly open the browser and search for any images like what I have and yes, it's one of the symptoms of having an HIV.

I got paranoid all days and night. I can't sleep and I can't focus on my work. I've feel itchiness brought to my by the rushes. Until I decided to be tested for HIV. It was my first time ever to be checked. It's June 20, 2015, I got tested for HIV and unfortunately, it was reactive.

With the recommendation provided to me by the satellite clinic, I've proceed to the treatment hub in RITM Alabang to undergo at my baseline test (June 30, 2015).

It turned out that my CD4 is 292. I asked the doctor everything that I need to ask and it was grateful that Dr. Garcia answered back to me very indiscriminately and fatherly.

I started my Lamizido now and Nevi, yet until now, I'm still alone, feeling depressed and I don't know...

XXX

POZZIEPINOY’S RESPONSE

Hi XXX,

Thank you for your email. Thank you for finding the blog and reading it. I really hope that you can find health tips for you to use in your daily life. 

Like most of us who have HIV, the first chapter of the "journey" is hard.

QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122
0916-216-2066

If you want to join a private HIV support group in Facebook, please add me, Pozzie Pinoy and request to be added in the group. We have a lot of PLHIV, counselors, HIV doctors, advocates and supporters who you can talk to.

I hope I was able to answer your concerns. Feel free to email me again if you have other questions.


Stay healthy,
Pozziepinoy




QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122

0916-216-2066




"We act FAST when we CARE"
-Pozziepinoy-



Want to be ASSISTED for the HIV TEST?? 
Check this link:


If you have comments or questions, please click this link:





© Copyright. All Rights Reserved by Pozziepinoy 2012

Credits: 



Sunday, July 19, 2015

To Win a War, You Have to Start One

To Win a War You Have To Start One
A Stage Play Review of the Necessary Theatre’s The Normal Heart


Jam-packed with socio-political underpinnings of gay dynamism in New York during the early 1980s, “The Normal Heart” highlighted the pressing issues bombarding the gay community particularly the male homosexual population which are still observable in the current times.

Produced by Actor’s Actors’ The Necessary Theatre, the stage play was bodily lifted from the original autobiographical play by Larry Kramer, an American playwright, author, public health advocate, and LGBT activist. Kramer was able to witness first-hand the spread of the disease later known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among his friends, thus the inspiration for the stage play itself. The play was also adapted into an HBO TV movie directed by Ryan Murphy and starred Mark Ruffalo who played the role of Ned Week and Matt Bomer as Felix Turner, Weeks’ love interest.


Topnotch theater actor Bart Guingona, who also directs the play, essayed the role of the very intense activist Ned Weeks who is both difficult and charming. Richard Cunanan took on the role of Ben Weeks — Ned’s brother, a lawyer, conservative, successful, tolerant of gays, loves his brother. Topper Fabregas played the role of Felix, a closeted, attractive, NY Times reporter. TV personality TJ Trinidad played the role of Bruce, a very handsome, charismatic, closeted All-American banker, elected to lead the organization. Also in the cast were Roselyn Perez, Red Concepcion, Nor Domingo and Jef Flores.


The story revolved around the character of Ned Weeks, a gay activist who struggled to pool resources and mobilize an organization to heave awareness about the fact that an unknown disease is killing off an incongruously unambiguous crowd: gay men mainly in New York City. Various external and internal factors were at play and served as hindrances for him to push further his advocacy. First was the government’s inadequate (or lack of) response regarding the issue; local authorities, particularly the mayor, just turned a deaf ear to the cries for help. Second was the double-edged sword social stigma against gay men that existed during those times. His character mirrored the immense push of advocates today to better address the issues enveloping HIV/AIDS such as government budget allocation, lack of education and information dissemination, research constraints, the public shame against the LGBT community, and a whole lot more.

Towards the end of the theater play, statistics and facts about HIV/AIDS condition in the Philippines were flashed on the backdrop. Putting those side by side with the storyline of the play, one can clearly say that New York 1980s is like Philippines 2015. The personal conflicts of the characters echoed the daily struggles of PLHIVs in the Philippines today. Kramer’s words are so powerful and emotionally charged that it would take exceptional actors to give them justice. This cast is more than up to the task. Standouts were Roselyn Perez, who played the role of the wheelchair-bound Dr. Brookner, whose delivery of an ardent speech paling against the rejection of the US government to fund her research into the disease is astounding in its intensity, and Domingo as Mickey, who also gets a pay heed moment of his own as he breaks down amidst the pressure of volunteering for the organization and keeping his job with the city government.

More than the emotional attack that was greatly showcased during the play, the message of the lines and the script served as a wakeup call to everyone: “HIV/AIDS is everybody’s concern.” How many Felix has to die? I guess all of us would say: none. We should all strive to unleash the hidden Ned Weeks in us: fearless, objective, and militant; quoting him, “That's how I want to be remembered: as one of the men who won the war.”




Saturday, July 18, 2015

To Win a War You Have To Start One

To Win a War You Have To Start One
A Stage Play Review of the Necessary Theatre’s The Normal Heart
by: Carlisle Saldana




Jam-packed with socio-political underpinnings of gay dynamism in New York during the early 1980s, “The Normal Heart” highlighted the pressing issues bombarding the gay community particularly the male homosexual population which are still observable in the current times.

Produced by Actor’s Actors’ The Necessary Theatre, the stage play was bodily lifted from the original autobiographical play by Larry Kramer, an American playwright, author, public health advocate, and LGBT activist. Kramer was able to witness first-hand the spread of the disease later known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among his friends, thus the inspiration for the stage play itself. The play was also adapted into an HBO TV movie directed by Ryan Murphy and starred Mark Ruffalo who played the role of Ned Week and Matt Bomer as Felix Turner, Weeks’ love interest.

Topnotch theater actor Bart Guingona, who also directs the play, essayed the role of the very intense activist Ned Weeks who is both difficult and charming. Richard Cunanan took on the role of Ben Weeks — Ned’s brother, a lawyer, conservative, successful, tolerant of gays, loves his brother. Topper Fabregas played the role of Felix, a closeted, attractive, NY Times reporter. TV personality TJ Trinidad played the role of Bruce, a very handsome, charismatic, closeted All-American banker, elected to lead the organization. Also in the cast were Roselyn Perez, Red Concepcion, Nor Domingo and Jef Flores.

The story revolved around the character of Ned Weeks, a gay activist who struggled to pool resources and mobilize an organization to heave awareness about the fact that an unknown disease is killing off an incongruously unambiguous crowd: gay men mainly in New York City. Various external and internal factors were at play and served as hindrances for him to push further his advocacy. First was the government’s inadequate (or lack of) response regarding the issue; local authorities, particularly the mayor, just turned a deaf ear to the cries for help. Second was the double-edged sword social stigma against gay men that existed during those times. His character mirrored the immense push of advocates today to better address the issues enveloping HIV/AIDS such as government budget allocation, lack of education and information dissemination, research constraints, the public shame against the LGBT community, and a whole lot more.

Towards the end of the theater play, statistics and facts about HIV/AIDS condition in the Philippines were flashed on the backdrop. Putting those side by side with the storyline of the play, one can clearly say that New York 1980s is like Philippines 2015. The personal conflicts of the characters echoed the daily struggles of PLHIVs in the Philippines today. Kramer’s words are so powerful and emotionally charged that it would take exceptional actors to give them justice. This cast is more than up to the task. 

Standouts were Roselyn Perez, who played the role of the wheelchair-bound Dr. Brookner, whose delivery of an ardent speech paling against the rejection of the US government to fund her research into the disease is astounding in its intensity, and Domingo as Mickey, who also gets a pay heed moment of his own as he breaks down amidst the pressure of volunteering for the organization and keeping his job with the city government.


More than the emotional attack that was greatly showcased during the play, the message of the lines and the script served as a wakeup call to everyone: “HIV/AIDS is everybody’s concern.” How many Felix has to die? I guess all of us would say: none. We should all strive to unleash the hidden Ned Weeks in us: fearless, objective, and militant; quoting him, “That's how I want to be remembered: as one of the men who won the war.”