The official site of The Project Red Ribbon Care Management Foundation, Inc. (TRR).

  • TRR LOVE FUND

    TRR Love Fund is the arm of the foundation which provides medical assistance to the financially challenged PLHIV.

  • Care assistance for HIV Test

    The Care Assistant Program involves assistance to HIV testing and HIV and AIDS Treatment hubs in the Philippines. Our volunteers schedule the client to the clinic or hub, assist with the procedure in the clinic or hub and conduct peer counseling

  • HOTLINE ASSISTANCE

    With the TRR Hotline Numbers, our volunteers answer concerns and inquiries about HIV and AIDS, do counselling, refers clients to nearest HIV Testing facility, HIV and AIDS Treatment Hub and government and NGO organizations for support

  • PEER COUNSELING

    The foundation volunteers conduct one-on-one counseling either on the phone or in person. They also conduct group counseling

  • SUPPORT GROUP TALK

    The support group talk (SGT) is a program that involves giving HIV lectures by guest speakers, discuss topics about HIV, care, treatment and support, discussion issues related to HIV

  • OUTREACH PROGRAM

    The foundation's outreach program is geared towards providing support to our fellow PLHIV's in the HIV and AIDS Treatment Hubs. Volunteers hand out of donations of medicines and special gifts to PLHIV, give inspirational talks by invited guests to a group of PLHIV, bonding over snacks or meal, visit the sick who are confined in the hospital

  • Referral System

    As part of treatment, the foundation's referral program involves our volunteers referring clients to specialized doctors who are HIV friendly. The foundation has it's own list of specialty doctors of low cost for the indigent PLHIV.

  • Online Support Group

    The foundation has a private Online Support Group in facebook. This group of advocates, supporters, counselors, health Workers and PLHIV

  • Home Health

    Aside from client counselling, the foundation volunteers also do family counselling and home visitation for awareness and continuance of care.

  • Health Fitness

    The foundation believes in holistic approach to treatment and care, thus inclusion of these programs: yoga, dance, swimming, jogging and running, boot camp workouts

  • EVENTS

    As part of awareness and education program, the foundation organizes its own national events to coincide with the international AIDS events: World AIDS Day and International AIDS Candlelight Memorial

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Road to Awareness


The Project Red Ribbon (TRR) will be inaugurating its newest project for this year, the Road to Awareness: an Open Discussion About HIV and Me. This is under the HIV Education and Awareness Talk program of TRR.

This is a Metro Manila wide HIV Awareness Caravan for universities, colleges and schools; companies, organizations and communities. The project includes an HIV talk, Testimonials from guest people living with HIV, condom and lubricant distribution; and HIV flyer distribution.

How can you participate?

1. Coordinate with your school, organization, company, barangay
2. Give us a schedule, venue and number participants for the talk
3. This is FREE. However, we ask as counterpart donations for the Love Fund.

For more details, please contact the TRR Hotline numbers below or email us at contact@projectredribbon.org.

May we all be partners in this great endeavor.

Thank you.








QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122
0916-216-2066

If you want to join a private HIV support group in Facebook, please add me, Pozzie Pinoy and request to be added in the group. We have a lot of PLHIV, counselors, HIV doctors, advocates and supporters who you can talk to.

I hope I was able to answer your concerns. Feel free to email me again if you have other questions.


Stay healthy,
Pozziepinoy

"We act FAST when we CARE"

-Pozziepinoy-



Want to be ASSISTED for the HIV TEST?? 
Check this link:


If you have comments or questions, please click this link:





© Copyright. All Rights Reserved by Pozziepinoy 2012

Credits: 














Confused

Dear Pozzie,

I am not good in writing in English Language, so please pardon me. Yes, as stated on the subject above, for me, it's like that everyday is like living with one foot in the grave.

It was end of May this year when notice that I am having a different symptoms of having an HIV. Mouth Ulcer are so frequent, then the rushes. I quickly open the browser and search for any images like what I have and yes, it's one of the symptoms of having an HIV.

I got paranoid all days and night. I can't sleep and I can't focus on my work. I've feel itchiness brought to my by the rushes. Until I decided to be tested for HIV. It was my first time ever to be checked. It's June 20, 2015, I got tested for HIV and unfortunately, it was reactive.

With the recommendation provided to me by the satellite clinic, I've proceed to the treatment hub in RITM Alabang to undergo at my baseline test (June 30, 2015).

It turned out that my CD4 is 292. I asked the doctor everything that I need to ask and it was grateful that Dr. Garcia answered back to me very indiscriminately and fatherly.

I started my Lamizido now and Nevi, yet until now, I'm still alone, feeling depressed and I don't know...

XXX

POZZIEPINOY’S RESPONSE

Hi XXX,

Thank you for your email. Thank you for finding the blog and reading it. I really hope that you can find health tips for you to use in your daily life. 

Like most of us who have HIV, the first chapter of the "journey" is hard.

QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122
0916-216-2066

If you want to join a private HIV support group in Facebook, please add me, Pozzie Pinoy and request to be added in the group. We have a lot of PLHIV, counselors, HIV doctors, advocates and supporters who you can talk to.

I hope I was able to answer your concerns. Feel free to email me again if you have other questions.


Stay healthy,
Pozziepinoy




QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122

0916-216-2066




"We act FAST when we CARE"
-Pozziepinoy-



Want to be ASSISTED for the HIV TEST?? 
Check this link:


If you have comments or questions, please click this link:





© Copyright. All Rights Reserved by Pozziepinoy 2012

Credits: 



Sunday, July 19, 2015

To Win a War, You Have to Start One

To Win a War You Have To Start One
A Stage Play Review of the Necessary Theatre’s The Normal Heart


Jam-packed with socio-political underpinnings of gay dynamism in New York during the early 1980s, “The Normal Heart” highlighted the pressing issues bombarding the gay community particularly the male homosexual population which are still observable in the current times.

Produced by Actor’s Actors’ The Necessary Theatre, the stage play was bodily lifted from the original autobiographical play by Larry Kramer, an American playwright, author, public health advocate, and LGBT activist. Kramer was able to witness first-hand the spread of the disease later known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among his friends, thus the inspiration for the stage play itself. The play was also adapted into an HBO TV movie directed by Ryan Murphy and starred Mark Ruffalo who played the role of Ned Week and Matt Bomer as Felix Turner, Weeks’ love interest.


Topnotch theater actor Bart Guingona, who also directs the play, essayed the role of the very intense activist Ned Weeks who is both difficult and charming. Richard Cunanan took on the role of Ben Weeks — Ned’s brother, a lawyer, conservative, successful, tolerant of gays, loves his brother. Topper Fabregas played the role of Felix, a closeted, attractive, NY Times reporter. TV personality TJ Trinidad played the role of Bruce, a very handsome, charismatic, closeted All-American banker, elected to lead the organization. Also in the cast were Roselyn Perez, Red Concepcion, Nor Domingo and Jef Flores.


The story revolved around the character of Ned Weeks, a gay activist who struggled to pool resources and mobilize an organization to heave awareness about the fact that an unknown disease is killing off an incongruously unambiguous crowd: gay men mainly in New York City. Various external and internal factors were at play and served as hindrances for him to push further his advocacy. First was the government’s inadequate (or lack of) response regarding the issue; local authorities, particularly the mayor, just turned a deaf ear to the cries for help. Second was the double-edged sword social stigma against gay men that existed during those times. His character mirrored the immense push of advocates today to better address the issues enveloping HIV/AIDS such as government budget allocation, lack of education and information dissemination, research constraints, the public shame against the LGBT community, and a whole lot more.

Towards the end of the theater play, statistics and facts about HIV/AIDS condition in the Philippines were flashed on the backdrop. Putting those side by side with the storyline of the play, one can clearly say that New York 1980s is like Philippines 2015. The personal conflicts of the characters echoed the daily struggles of PLHIVs in the Philippines today. Kramer’s words are so powerful and emotionally charged that it would take exceptional actors to give them justice. This cast is more than up to the task. Standouts were Roselyn Perez, who played the role of the wheelchair-bound Dr. Brookner, whose delivery of an ardent speech paling against the rejection of the US government to fund her research into the disease is astounding in its intensity, and Domingo as Mickey, who also gets a pay heed moment of his own as he breaks down amidst the pressure of volunteering for the organization and keeping his job with the city government.

More than the emotional attack that was greatly showcased during the play, the message of the lines and the script served as a wakeup call to everyone: “HIV/AIDS is everybody’s concern.” How many Felix has to die? I guess all of us would say: none. We should all strive to unleash the hidden Ned Weeks in us: fearless, objective, and militant; quoting him, “That's how I want to be remembered: as one of the men who won the war.”




Saturday, July 18, 2015

To Win a War You Have To Start One

To Win a War You Have To Start One
A Stage Play Review of the Necessary Theatre’s The Normal Heart
by: Carlisle Saldana




Jam-packed with socio-political underpinnings of gay dynamism in New York during the early 1980s, “The Normal Heart” highlighted the pressing issues bombarding the gay community particularly the male homosexual population which are still observable in the current times.

Produced by Actor’s Actors’ The Necessary Theatre, the stage play was bodily lifted from the original autobiographical play by Larry Kramer, an American playwright, author, public health advocate, and LGBT activist. Kramer was able to witness first-hand the spread of the disease later known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among his friends, thus the inspiration for the stage play itself. The play was also adapted into an HBO TV movie directed by Ryan Murphy and starred Mark Ruffalo who played the role of Ned Week and Matt Bomer as Felix Turner, Weeks’ love interest.

Topnotch theater actor Bart Guingona, who also directs the play, essayed the role of the very intense activist Ned Weeks who is both difficult and charming. Richard Cunanan took on the role of Ben Weeks — Ned’s brother, a lawyer, conservative, successful, tolerant of gays, loves his brother. Topper Fabregas played the role of Felix, a closeted, attractive, NY Times reporter. TV personality TJ Trinidad played the role of Bruce, a very handsome, charismatic, closeted All-American banker, elected to lead the organization. Also in the cast were Roselyn Perez, Red Concepcion, Nor Domingo and Jef Flores.

The story revolved around the character of Ned Weeks, a gay activist who struggled to pool resources and mobilize an organization to heave awareness about the fact that an unknown disease is killing off an incongruously unambiguous crowd: gay men mainly in New York City. Various external and internal factors were at play and served as hindrances for him to push further his advocacy. First was the government’s inadequate (or lack of) response regarding the issue; local authorities, particularly the mayor, just turned a deaf ear to the cries for help. Second was the double-edged sword social stigma against gay men that existed during those times. His character mirrored the immense push of advocates today to better address the issues enveloping HIV/AIDS such as government budget allocation, lack of education and information dissemination, research constraints, the public shame against the LGBT community, and a whole lot more.

Towards the end of the theater play, statistics and facts about HIV/AIDS condition in the Philippines were flashed on the backdrop. Putting those side by side with the storyline of the play, one can clearly say that New York 1980s is like Philippines 2015. The personal conflicts of the characters echoed the daily struggles of PLHIVs in the Philippines today. Kramer’s words are so powerful and emotionally charged that it would take exceptional actors to give them justice. This cast is more than up to the task. 

Standouts were Roselyn Perez, who played the role of the wheelchair-bound Dr. Brookner, whose delivery of an ardent speech paling against the rejection of the US government to fund her research into the disease is astounding in its intensity, and Domingo as Mickey, who also gets a pay heed moment of his own as he breaks down amidst the pressure of volunteering for the organization and keeping his job with the city government.


More than the emotional attack that was greatly showcased during the play, the message of the lines and the script served as a wakeup call to everyone: “HIV/AIDS is everybody’s concern.” How many Felix has to die? I guess all of us would say: none. We should all strive to unleash the hidden Ned Weeks in us: fearless, objective, and militant; quoting him, “That's how I want to be remembered: as one of the men who won the war.”

Friday, July 17, 2015

It's OK


Bound by each other's arms, as we formed a circle, tears started flowing from "Sandra's" eyes and dripped on to the floor while we were lead to a prayer of healing. I tried to hold back the tears as I was facilitating the TRR Family Support Group (SGT). Afterwards she started to burst, and said "I knew it! I knew that's his disease... I knew that he is gay but he should have told us this (HIV)! The doctor's said that we all should be ready now..."

When it comes to HIV and AIDS, the family, most of the time, is the last to know. More heartbreaking when the person is already unconscious as opportunistic infections caused by his weakened immune system continue to batter his weak body. The family, confused, though with an inkling of what's going on, continues to hope for the better however though looks for guidance and understanding as to why things are happening. Standing on unknown territory, family members start to question everything. "Why did this happen? Why did you hide it from us?" 


In the shadows

In the shadows by Red Papercut

Carefree is not careless

“No limits,” He used to say whenever people asked him how I lived his life. His name is Mark and this is his story.

He was a 30 year-old bachelor with no particular career issues or plans. He wakes up, go to work, meet some friends and go home to his dormitory room to sleep and the cycle repeats the very next day. The only days he had for himself were weekends. Saturday was his private time and Sunday was spent going home to his parent’s house in Rizal province.

A Bachelor's life

He was impulsive yet tactful. Always thinking what he should do next. But when it comes to sex, he never thinks twice. He said he wasn’t the type who would settle down with a partner though he never dismissed the idea of having a family of his own. And so he never held back his lust and simply indulged whenever he likes the girl or the guy. He was a stocky, furry bear type and would go for any type of guy as long as the feeling is mutual. He said when it comes to girls, he was very picky. But it was different when it comes to guys especially when gay social media and apps started to popularize in 2011.

And that was how we met. He was a very nice and gentle guy at first but once you get to know him, he’s funny and quite flirty. At first he never mentioned about sex or going anywhere private but once or twice after we first met, perhaps he was no longer able to restrain himself; he then asked me if we could do it. And that night we spent it like there was no tomorrow. He said he’s really careful when it comes to sex that’s why he always use condoms whichever his role would be, “nag-iingat lang,” as he would always say. He always had a box of condoms and a huge bottle of diluted lubricant. He said it was a necessity for a horny bachelor like him. I let him do as he pleased. It was safe after all.

But then months went by and our encounters became wilder and wilder and we no longer do it just the two of us. There would be a third wheel or even another pair of guys to swap with. And there were times I no longer need to do anything as I watched him indulge in his worldly pleasures. There are times that he runs out of condoms because his sexual encounters were becoming more and more frequent than the usual, or perhaps he was getting addicted to sex. I got scared for him and for myself so I lay low for a while. Until we no longer get to talk to each other that much.

And then...

Year 2012 came and we finally got to have a little get-together in his dorm and he told me he met a guy and they’re in this rather complicated relationship. He said he no longer meets other guys. But his boyfriend is still suspicious of him that the guy would hack into his Facebook account and check messages. His boyfriend was even able to get numbers from his phone and contact unfamiliar names such as mine. I wasn’t able to help him until summer of 2012. His boyfriend called me up saying that my friend Mark is cheating on him. Of course knowing the story I ignored it. But what alarmed me was the next series of messages from him saying that he got diagnosed HIV positive and Mark was the only person who he had unprotected sex.

Worried, I contacted Mark and he admitted to me that it was true. And apparently he too was HIV positive and advised me to get tested as well. After that contact, I did not hear anything from him until the next year. 

A New Life

Monsoon season of 2013 and I was already in the HIV advocacy when I remembered and reached out to him. We were able to talk via Facebook and he said he was doing fine and was under Anti-Retroviral Therapy. He said his life was practically back to normal except for that fact that he no longer does his “private parties” in his dorm. He said he moved out to a much closer place to his work. Though I was relieved that he was doing a great job coping up with his condition, I could sense a heavy heart in him despite being able to fight on.  I was no longer able to contact him since his alleged boyfriend of his still hacks into his account and still acted like a mad watchdog over his boyfriend. I do feel sorry for him for what happened. I think he was just trying to find someone who will have fun and accept him for who he was. But fate was not in his favor. 

But with proper adherence to ARVs, and a healthy lifestyle, I know he could do it. The only thing that bothers me is the fact that his boyfriend is telling anyone about Mark’s status which should not be. 

Under Republic Act 8504, PLHIV’s status should be treated with utmost confidentiality and no one, not even his/her doctors are allowed to disclose HIV status but the patient himself/herself and violating this are punishable by civil law.

I wish his story will serve as a warning to people who are living their lives to the fullest in a very disturbing way. There’s nothing wrong with having sex. Casual sex is fine as long as you take care of yourself. So get tested and educate yourself.

Life is important. Love it. Nurture it. Value it.



Disclaimer: The names and some details in the story were deliberately changed to protect the identity of the people involved as well as to maintain confidentiality of this case.





QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122
0916-216-2066


If you want to join a private HIV support group in Facebook, please add me, Pozzie Pinoy and request to be added in the group. We have a lot of PLHIV, counselors, HIV doctors, advocates and supporters who you can talk to.







"We act FAST when we CARE"

-Pozziepinoy-



Want to be ASSISTED for the HIV TEST?? 
Check this link:


If you have comments or questions, please click this link:





© Copyright. All Rights Reserved by Pozziepinoy 2012

Credits: 





Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Get Tested Now!


What's stopping you from taking the HIV Test?

1. "People will judge me!"

The HIV testing centers' staff are professional. They are trained to give out the test and not to judge anybody. Of course there will be some who would be judgemental, as the world is not perfect. But who cares? Take the test, get the result and leave the facility. You won't see them again anyways. 

Is it important what others will think of you? Will it kill you if others may judge (or even look at you)  as "dirty", "promiscuous", type cast you as gay or "MSM", etc. etc. 

What is important is what you think of yourself. You need to be in control of your health and that is the most important thing. You need to be in control of your life and others' perception of you doesn't matter, at all.

2. "What if the result is POSITIVE?"

It is better to know early on than be sorry. One, you can get treatment fast. Second, you won't regret later on that you have been a carrier without you knowing it and may have passed it to others.

Some people because of fear, gets tested late, which results to being sick from opportunistic infections or AIDS related illnesses. Because of their fear to know through the HIV test, they already have pneumonia, tuberculosis, meningitis, skin diseases, eye problems or gastro intestinal issues when they seek treatment. Some are already in their death beds before even taking the HIV test.

Denial is a killer. I, for one had unprotected sex before and didn't get tested until I was already bed ridden from bi-basal pneumonia plus pneumocystis pneumonia. I was already suffering, couldn't walk for more than 2 meters without catching my breath. I had continuous diarrhea and on and off fever for one month. Yet, I ignored these symptoms. I almost died, but I continued to deny it until my doctor told me that I needed to take the HIV test right there in my hospital room.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Worried OFW

Dear Pozzie, 

I hope things are going well with you and the rest of the support group.

Since I have found out that my partner is HIV +, it always bother me as I might be infected but thank God since I met him last 2012 until my last test on November 2013, I was diagnosed negative.

I am an OFW working in the middle east. The last test I had was during my employment medical exam on NOV-2013, since then I haven't had any contact with partner. I went for vacation last December-2014 and we dont have any vaginal intercourse other than the oral sex. 

Family Support Group Talk

The Project Red Ribbon recently conducted its Family Support Group Talk (SGT) at the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine wards. The goal of this support group was to gather family members and partners of patients with HIV in the ward and conduct a talk about acceptance.

In the private room 1 of RITM ward, all 11 participants came: parents, sibling, relative and partner and listened to our messages, testimonials. Five persons with HIV talked about their HIV journeys and their lives. Some participants voiced out their concerns and their thoughts. Some cried while the talk was going on. At the end of the session, we conducted a music therapy where the participants wrote love letters to their sons, daughters, sibling, nephew and partner confined in the ward.

The Family SGT is scheduled every Monday afternoon at RITM, a joint project of Project Red Ribbon and the AIDS Research Group headed by Dr. Rossana Ditangco. 










"We act FAST when we CARE"

-Pozziepinoy-



Want to be ASSISTED for the HIV TEST?? 
Check this link:


If you have comments or questions, please click this link:





© Copyright. All Rights Reserved by Pozziepinoy 2012

Credits: 













Friday, July 10, 2015

This is My Battle

Hi Pozzie! 

Just call me Blair 30 year old Registered Nurse living in the Philippines. I was diagnosed HIV+ last April 2015 thru Love Yourself Anglo in Mandaluyong. though i was expecting it because i am experiencing some drastic changes on my body, i've been very weak. Been sickly, admitted to the hospital twice due to pneumonia.  When i learned that i am HIV+ i had a dilemma of telling it to my family or not.

May 19, 2015

i was hospitalized again because of an allergic reaction due to cotrimoxazole ( nag self medicate ako, which is not good) since i suspect myself of having PCP. And i was having oral thrush. My doctor talked to me in private and told me that she was suspecting me of having HIV, though i know already that i am HIV+ i just acted and told my doctor that ill be having my HIV screening after my discharge in the hospital. When i got home after my discharge, i received a text from my sister that she is suspecting me of having HIV and she will accompany me to RITM alabang. But i told her that i know a private treatment hub so  we went there with my mom and dad. I was surprised that my mom was also suspecting  me of having HIV  because of having pneumonia twice and told my dad. My mom told me that my dad cried and i felt bad. But the good thing of letting your family know of your condition is that the will support you all throughout without hearing any words from them. Hindi sila nagalit sakin or nagtanong ng kung ano ano. "Bakit hindi ka nag ingat, Nurse ka alam mo yon" those were the only words i heard from my mom.

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Another Long Weekend


It's official. 

July 17, 2015, Friday, is a regular holiday in observance of Eid'l Fitr (Feast of Ramadhan). 

To all my brothers and sisters, this is another long weekend so please plan your ARV refill at your hub, your lab tests and doctors consultation.

Most of the government HIV testing facilities are also closed during the long weekend. We advice everyone to call the clinic first before going so as not to waste your valuable time.

Please plan your HIV and AIDS Hub visit. Call their hotline numbers for rescheduling if possible if your schedule falls on the holiday.

Thank you.







QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND AIDS?
WANT TO GET TESTED?
CALL US!

TRR HIV Hotline Numbers 


0919-642-9286
0977-131-2046
0906-389-2402
 0917-899-0473
0927-823-0300 
0917-932-3122
0916-216-2066

If you want to join a private HIV support group in Facebook, please add me, Pozzie Pinoy and request to be added in the group. We have a lot of PLHIV, counselors, HIV doctors, advocates and supporters who you can talk to.

I hope I was able to answer your concerns. Feel free to email me again if you have other questions.


Stay healthy,
Pozziepinoy

"We act FAST when we CARE"

-Pozziepinoy-



Want to be ASSISTED for the HIV TEST?? 
Check this link:


If you have comments or questions, please click this link:





© Copyright. All Rights Reserved by Pozziepinoy 2012

Credits: